Monthly Archives: July 2013

Workplace Discrimination Series: Kimya Afi Ayodele

“I remember thinking, ‘What do I say to my daughter? I’m going to be home before she gets home.’ … I remember thinking rent is due. … I remember thinking practical matters about finances.” – Kimya Afi Ayodele

Very few options for legal recourse exist when addressing workplace discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, or LGBT, workers. This comes at a time when most Americans support federal workplace protections for LGBT workers. In a 2011 Center for American Progress poll, 73 percent of likely 2012 voters supported protecting LGBT workers from workplace discrimination. This tremendous support even crossed political party affiliation—81 percent of Democrats, 74 percent of independents, and 66 percent of Republicans supported nondiscrimination laws that would protect LGBT workers.

Read the full article at the Center for American Progress.

Workplace Discrimination Series: Kylar Broadus

“People have always related to me as male; that is my essence and my soul. The transition was a matter of actually living the truth, of sharing the truth with the world.” – Kylar Broadus

Employment is essential to an individual’s ability to support himself or herself, as well as his or her family. Although everyone deserves equal treatment under the law, those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, or LGBT, are far too often unemployed or underemployed because of discrimination based solely on sexual orientation and/or gender identity.

Data suggest that transgender and gender-nonconforming Americans suffer worse rates of workplace discrimination—and did so even prior to the Great Recession—having a negative impact on the lives of many Americans. Moreover, workplace discrimination has caused many transgender men and women to seek other sources of income—from sex work or drug sales, for example—simply to maintain a living.

Read the full article at the Center for American Progress.

Workplace Discrimination Series: Sam Hall

Discrimination has no place in our society, and the workplace is no exception.

For lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, or LGBT, workers, it is harder to find and keep a good job; this is rooted in discrimination based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity. Since there are no federal workplace protections for LGBT workers, many experience countless hardships and barriers.

In the United States it is assumed if an individual works diligently he or she will be assessed on employment qualifications—not on factors unrelated to job performance. LGBT workers, however, often experience the opposite. As with other workers, LGBT workers deserve a job with a safe and supportive environment where a person’s abilities to succeed will be evaluated rather than a person’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity.

Read the full article at the Center for American Progress.

Workplace Discrimination Series: Mia Macy

Make no mistake: Workplace discrimination against the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, or LGBT, community is an ongoing problem that has made it difficult for many LGBT workers to financially provide for their families.

In the United States, LGBT workers often face a broken bargain from the lack of federal employment protections. Since no federal law exists, LGBT individuals are often terminated solely based on sexual orientation and/or gender identity. Generally, this means that LGBT individuals are either not hired for positions for which they are qualified or they are currently employed at places where they experience daily harassment.

Read the full article at the Center for American Progress.

Why the LGBT Community Still Needs the Ryan White Program

Recent estimates of new HIV infections, or HIV incidence, suggest that HIV continues to be a severe problem in the United States. In a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, approximately 47,500 people in the United States contracted HIV in 2010. Compared to 2008, HIV incidence stayed relatively stable in most groups, even decreasing by 21 percent (from 7,700 infections to 6,100 infections) among black women. The statistics among men who have sex with men, or MSM,* and transgender women, however, did not improve to the same degree. There was even a significant increase in HIV incidence among black MSM and transgender women.

For all individuals living with HIV, and especially those populations with increased infection rates, reauthorization of the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act, also known simply as the Ryan White program, is crucial. Ryan White is the largest federal programthat provides treatment specifically for people living with HIV/AIDS. If the Ryan White program is not reauthorized, many people living with HIV will face serious and possibly life-threatening consequences, such as gaps in care not met by other payers and decreased access to medical treatment and services from health care providers.

Read the full article at the Center for American Progress.